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Discography > Albums > My Generation

My Generation

For more information check these links:
Liner Notes with additions and corrections by Brian Cady
Wikipedia
Whitefang's Who Site

Disc Track # Song
1 1Out in the Street
1 2I Don't Mind
1 3The Good's Gone
1 4La La La Lies
1 5Much Too Much
1 6My Generation
1 7The Kids Are Alright
1 8Please, Please, Please
1 9It's Not True
1 10I'm a Man
1 11A Legal Matter
1 12The Ox
1 13Circles
1 14I Can't Explain
1 15Bald Headed Woman
1 16Daddy Rolling Stone
2 1Leaving Here
2 2Lubie (Come Back Home)
2 3Shout and Shimmy
2 4Heat Wave
2 5Motoring
2 6Anytime You Want Me
2 7Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere
2 8Instant Party Mixture
2 9I Don't Mind
2 10The Good's Gone
2 11My Generation
2 12Anytime You Want Me
2 13A Legal Matter
2 14My Generation

Buy it at one of these fine online retailers
The Who - My Generation

Here are some reviews of this album:


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

This is my favourite album of all time. I cant believe that people complain about its choice of material or quality of vocals or pete's 'unmatured' songwriting. This album is everything that British guitar music needs and lacks at the moment, pure excitement, freshness, rawness, perfect pop tunes and raw R n b. Keith's drumming is like one huge drum solo, Pete's guitar is innovative as ever without all that self indulgent Isle of White type rubbish, Johns bass playing is innovative and original, Rogers vocals are young and aggressive and full of emotion and its all stuck together with fantastic hooks, sweet harmonies and fantastic pop songwriting. Kinda like the Beatles on French Blues. Out on the street - awesome powerful aggressive opener, I Don't Mind, great soul stuff, Goods Gone - moody pop sounds, La la Lies is a great jaunty pop song nice sound, Much too Much is a great piece of pop music, almost exhilarating, My Generation (well you know what THAT is), Please Please Please is a nice change of pace after the positive craft of 'kids', Its Not True is a pointer to Where Pete's natural quirkiness as a songwriter was going, same with A legal Matter, I'm A Man - great bit of R 'n' B and then the Ox which is great fun and a nice powerful finish. No mature songwriting? Bah humbug, go and dig your Led Zeppelin albums out and forget what is like to be a young. I love this album. At 18 people think I'm a bit odd.


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

For me as mod is that a great album. I bought it in America. My favourite songs are MY GENERATION, THE KIDS ARE ALRIGHT, MUCH TOO MUCH, INSTANT PARTY and LA LA LA LIES. I think that all these songs are the best works of the Album. The best lyric, I think, is "I HOPE I DIE BEFORE I GET OLD" in my generation. Have a nice day.


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

What a great album! From start to finish this album packs a ferocious punch. Alot of great feedback and songs. The Ox is just fucking nuts as well as some fine James brown covers and group originals. Anyone wanting to dig further into mid 1960's British rock will want to hear the dutch Outsiders, Q65, Pretty Things, Wimple Winch, The Birds, Tintern Abbey, The Move, and the great Poets. All these bands are fantastic and innovative.


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

This isn't the best debut by a British rock band ever (I prefer the debuts of the Stones, the Clash, and the Sex Pistols, personally), nor is it even close to being the Who's finest moment. It does contain a clutch of memorable Townshend originals ("The Kids Are Alright," "A Legal Matter," and two semi-forgotten songs which I love, "The Good's Gone" and "It's Not True," which basically presents a prototype for punk to the world), as well as two banal James Brown covers in which Daltrey's overemoting nearly matches that of Dave Davies on "Beautiful Delilah," from another Shel Talmy-produced debut (truly a hysterical performance). "My Generation" itself can't really be counted; it was made as a single and thus stands apart from the album (and anyway it's hard to separate the song from its historical context, although as a performance, it's the early Who at their very best).
What makes this album are the performances, even of the weak songs (excepting the two covers, which nothing can save; another instance of Daltrey's poor judgment at this stage of their career). The sound is muscular and raw; despite Talmy's ineptitude behind the board, the Who never sounded quite so powerful even when they turned the volume up higher (one listen to "The Ox" and you'll be convinced). The performances are enough to put the album ahead of the Beatles' and Kinks' debuts, but it's not the best album of its era. For a great Who album go for Sell Out or Who By Numbers or Meaty, Beaty, Big And Bouncy; for a great live album, go for Leeds or Isle of Wight. But if you want to hear the young Who (plus Nicky Hopkins) in all their angry awkward glory, this is the album to get. Even minus one of the original songs and in poor sound quality, the album still burns.


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

What's up with the word "Sing", on the US version, huh? Oh well. This I think, set The Who's image for their entire career. "Hope I die before I get old." The words which haunt Pete Townshend the worst. But this is the Who like they were at the Marquee and the Goldhawk. This is the Who, before they got caught up in rock operas, and synthesizers.
I think it's one of the hardest rock albums. If your listen to this, and then something later, oh, say, "The Who by Numbers", you can see where they've come from.




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