The Hypertext Who  
I'm One

Success Story

Guitar and Pen

Goin' Mobile

My Generation
Article Archive
Bibliography
Who Associates

See Me, Feel Me

Join Together
Odds & Sods
Chat Room

The Seeker

A Legal Matter
A Word about Copyrights
Privacy Policy

Bargain
The Who Official Merchandise

Discography > Albums > My Generation

Shop at
The Who Sell Out
for Official Merchandise!
The Who Official Store
The Who US Tour 2008!
Fan Club Presales
are happening now!
Join The Who Fan Club for Presale Access!

My Generation

For more information check these links:
Liner Notes with additions and corrections by Brian Cady
Wikipedia
Whitefang's Who Site

Disc Track # Song
1 1Out in the Street
1 2I Don't Mind
1 3The Good's Gone
1 4La La La Lies
1 5Much Too Much
1 6My Generation
1 7The Kids Are Alright
1 8Please, Please, Please
1 9It's Not True
1 10I'm a Man
1 11A Legal Matter
1 12The Ox
1 13Circles
1 14I Can't Explain
1 15Bald Headed Woman
1 16Daddy Rolling Stone
2 1Leaving Here
2 2Lubie (Come Back Home)
2 3Shout and Shimmy
2 4Heat Wave
2 5Motoring
2 6Anytime You Want Me
2 7Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere
2 8Instant Party Mixture
2 9I Don't Mind
2 10The Good's Gone
2 11My Generation
2 12Anytime You Want Me
2 13A Legal Matter
2 14My Generation

Buy it at one of these fine online retailers
The Who - My Generation

Here are some reviews of this album:


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

Ok, so Pete stole a Kinks' groove when he wrote "I Can't Explain", but this album blows away anything The Kinks, The Beatles, or The Stones did up to this point. I think for a bands debut album this ranks up with if not above Led Zeppelin I or The Doors first album. "Out in the Streets" and "The Goods Gone" are total rockers. Remember at this point the Beatles were still singing "I Wanna Hold Your Hand". Roger's vocals (which is my least favorite member) are nothing but angry and powerful on every song which he's on, plus "The Ox" which he is not on is angry enough without him. This is Roger's second best effort, besides Quadrophenia. I'm glad they made this album, because I couldn't live without it. "Keith wasn't a timekeeper", and I'm glad.


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

Right from the opening bars of 'Out in the street', this really does become the definitive Mod experience! I can remember donning my parka and going down to the 400 ballroom (giddy heights!) with this Lp burning a hole through my turntable during the lengthy 'choosing of the clothes' time. The thing with the oooooo is, and maybe this is my age (33), that most of their albums sound like many bands 'Greatest Hits'.....That's the quality of not only the music or lyrics.....but the feel. MY GENERATION.......THE KIDS ARE ALRIGHT...youth statements if ever I heard one! This stuff should be played in schools. At the age of 15, Legal Matter was just a great song....at my present age, it's a reality. That's the difference with the Who...they meant it! ps. Keith Moon's drumming on the 'OX' is the first time I thought of the drums as a solo instrument.


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

This is the (American version of) the first album the Who brought out. It captures their early live sound very good and features some nice songs. Unfortunately this album hasn't been remastered yet because the producer (Shel Talmy) refuses to make the master tapes available. Back to the album! It sounds a bit thin compared to their later works but the lyrics are all very strong, typical Townshend (except the songs he didn't write of course). The hardest hitting song is of course the title track "My Generation", often hailed as the first punk song and as teenage athem (even now it expresses the teenage mood very good). Other great songs on this album include "The Kids Are Alright" (which makes a brief appearance on the Quadrophenia album and is also the title of the 1979 movie about The Who), "Instant Party (Circles)" and "The Ox" (an instrumental piece somewhat "surf" sounding, with a very strong drum-bass section). In all, this album is a must for everybody interested in British music around '65. The Who have always been one of the leading British bands and here's where it all started.


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

Given that it is one the strongest debuts in rock history. Given that it is far superior to the band's second album. Also given that Pete's songwriting was very mature, even in its infancy. This album showcases the best of the early, raw, Mod Who. They quickly abandoned this approach to create more sophisticated songs and arrangements. One can only wonder what would happen if this record was remixed and repackaged like the rest of the Who catalogue. This is my one problem with the record: the muddy sound. I know most folks feel that is what makes it so classic, but the Stones' Exile was redone to great success. That's a very muddy album. I just wish this album was taken out of the hands of Shel Talmy and could stand with the rest of the albums in new clothing. Overall, I'd agree that this is early Who at its very best. The real strength is that Townshend was already setting teen angst to loud guitars. Moon made his presence felt by letting listeners know that he was one of the most original drummers in Rock. Entwistle proved that he was the most gifted bass player of his generation. Daltrey had a ways to go, but he was still competent enough to handle the growling R&B numbers. It would still be hard pressed to forsee the glories to come. The Who did make better albums than this, but as Rock debuts go, this one stands as one the greatest.


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

The Who seemed to have a lot of diverse musical influences early on. On their first album you can hear the influence of early 60's black R&B, surf music, the Beatles, the Beach Boys' harmonies, the blues, aggressive power chording, and punked-out industrial noise. So it's not a cohesive sound really but that's what makes the Who so interesting to begin with. It's the hard-edged playing and singing of "Out In the Street", "The Ox", and "The Good's Gone" that provided a preview of what this group was all about. The only real downers are Daltrey's two failed attempts at covering James Brown. Other than that his singing fits the songs perfectly. And Townshend's debut vocal on "A Legal Matter" ain't bad at all, although his singing would continue to improve over time. Keith and Pete go absolutely nuts on "The Ox". Wonder what the Decca engineers must have been thinking as that one was being cut? And John Entwistle establishes himself as just about the best bass player ever. Who else was playing bass soloes back in 1965? The Who are often noted as having putting out the best live album ever. As far as this particular studio effort goes, there are certainly flaws here and there, but overall this should be considered one of the better debut albums.




The logos and trademarks used on this site are the property of their respective owners
We are not responsible for comments posted by our users, as they are the property of the poster

Interactive software released under GNU GPL, Code Credits, Privacy Policy