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Discography > Albums > My Generation

My Generation

For more information check these links:
Liner Notes with additions and corrections by Brian Cady
Wikipedia
Whitefang's Who Site

Disc Track # Song
1 1Out in the Street
1 2I Don't Mind
1 3The Good's Gone
1 4La La La Lies
1 5Much Too Much
1 6My Generation
1 7The Kids Are Alright
1 8Please, Please, Please
1 9It's Not True
1 10I'm a Man
1 11A Legal Matter
1 12The Ox
1 13Circles
1 14I Can't Explain
1 15Bald Headed Woman
1 16Daddy Rolling Stone
2 1Leaving Here
2 2Lubie (Come Back Home)
2 3Shout and Shimmy
2 4Heat Wave
2 5Motoring
2 6Anytime You Want Me
2 7Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere
2 8Instant Party Mixture
2 9I Don't Mind
2 10The Good's Gone
2 11My Generation
2 12Anytime You Want Me
2 13A Legal Matter
2 14My Generation

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The Who - My Generation

Here are some reviews of this album:


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

This is the (American version of) the first album the Who brought out. It captures their early live sound very good and features some nice songs. Unfortunately this album hasn't been remastered yet because the producer (Shel Talmy) refuses to make the master tapes available. Back to the album! It sounds a bit thin compared to their later works but the lyrics are all very strong, typical Townshend (except the songs he didn't write of course). The hardest hitting song is of course the title track "My Generation", often hailed as the first punk song and as teenage athem (even now it expresses the teenage mood very good). Other great songs on this album include "The Kids Are Alright" (which makes a brief appearance on the Quadrophenia album and is also the title of the 1979 movie about The Who), "Instant Party (Circles)" and "The Ox" (an instrumental piece somewhat "surf" sounding, with a very strong drum-bass section). In all, this album is a must for everybody interested in British music around '65. The Who have always been one of the leading British bands and here's where it all started.


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

123213


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

This debut album is sensational and truly announces The Who to the world in a manner that was befitting their ultimate status. While The Who were "late to the scene" with this album (already well behind the Kinks, Stones, and Beatles with their debut's), the wait may well be what distinguishes this album -- and the band -- from their cohorts on the British scene.
The legendary Shel Talmy's (legendary for good and bad reasons) production gives The Who an unusually strong and thick wall of sound that the Yardbirds, and Pretty Things only were able to grasp in moments of brilliance. Keith's drums and Pete's early bar chord guitar riffs are in full force and sound superb (cleaner on the British pressing I might add). The only quibble I have with production is the occasional reticence to really embrace John Entwistle. While he is prominent in songs such as My Generation (obviously) and The OX, his playing is relegated to background for many other fine songs such as "Out in the Streets" and Kids Are Alright.
To the songs themselves: Pete shows himself early as a brilliant and clever songwriter. While his lyricism is yet to blossom fully (wait for Sell Out for that!), his chord construction and courage to create aggressive songs mixed with beautiful melodies is a real harbinger for The Who fans. Every Townshend penned song is worthy of praise in its own way. Of particular note, My Generation's out and out aggression and defiance; The Kids Are Alright's sweet melody (and contrary lyrics) should have been the follow up single to Generation and pushed hard by the label; The Good's Gone opening Rickenbacher riff (foreshadowing the Byrds) and (on the American version) Instant party (aka Circles in European EP release) brilliant song construction are enough for the album to be great. But for sure, the country-esque Legal Matter, Out In the Streets, Much Too Much and so on are all there just for added enjoyment. Each of these are a must for any person trying to learn how to play like Pete!
My only complaints with the album -- making it a 4.5 star and not five star -- are the covers. Roger's over-the-top machismo vocals are a little too much for my taste. Plus, who plays a Who album to hear covers? The American version comes with two James Brown covers. Both fine, but really who cares? The Brit version has an interesting but in the end unconvincing version of Bo Diddley's I'm a Man. Great musical break in the middle, but again, Roger's vocals are just ridiculous. Luckily an early review of the album (by MNE?) panned the first version of this album's song choices (which contained many more covers) as out of date and boring. That sent Pete back to the tape machine where he penned three last minute additions: La la la lies, the brilliant It's Not True, and The Ox (a wild and barely recognizable cover of the Safari's Wipe Out) which is actually not penned so much as performed (with vigor). Nicky Hopkins piano work is brilliant on this.
The forgotten covers are apparently one more James Brown cover (name escapes me) that they performed on BBC, Lubie, and the Vandella's Motoring. All good, but not as good as a Pete song.


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

As a debut release this is a stunner.
The album is raw, unpolished as a porcupine's backside and I wouldn't change a thing!. Music like this today doesn't exist!, everything is polished refined and over-produced to the point of being antiseptic. This is not.
The band have gone into the studio and QUICKLY fired out an album. I love to hear music made this way. There is a raw nervous energy about the whole that is very infectious. My Generation , of course a Who standard is perfect by its very imperfections. The album might be called 'The Who Sings My Generation' but it is ironic because the singing is so bad!. That's what I love about it, full of mistakes.
It reminds me of The Clash's brilliant debut album some 12 years after this one.
Standout tracks? My Generation, The Kids are Alright, A Legal Matter etc.
Listen to this album to remember where The Who came from. Such an explosive debut that would lead to their more mature period some four years on.


Reviewer: anonymous
Rating:

I'm going to be reviewing the American version of this album since I don't have the British version which puts on "I'm a Man" in place of "Instant Party (Circles)." This is a very good debut album, as good of a debut album, I think, as Please Please Me. This was the seventh Who album I listened to (as I also bought AQO during the same visit to the music store but played MG first), and my first impression was that it was pretty good, and I had been really surprised to find it, since it's so rare despite not being out of print, and it was only $7.99! It might have been a different first listening experience if there had been liner notes to go along with the songs, or even some bonus tracks, but then I decided to give it a listen with an open mind and listen to it how it was originally created, only a dozen tracks and no fancy liner notes and bonus tracks, things which never even existed back in 1965! Instead of being like a flowery concept album or a pop extravaganza, this is straight R&B with an infusion of rock. And as a debut album, there can't be any unfair comparisons to later albums the way some reviewers have been doing with other albums, since if an original fan first heard the album when it came out, then s/he wouldn't have had any knowledge of the later albums to compare them favorably or unfavorably! Some people could criticize this album for not having much or any vocal range or any complex songs, but that's all part of the band's history and it really isn't fair to compare the album of a band just starting out to one of their later albums, one with greater vocal range and songs with deeper meanings and themes. There are a lot of really great mostly-unknown gems on this record, like "La La La Lies," "Out in the Street," "It's Not True," the James Brown covers, and my favorite, "Instant Party (Circles)," in addition to the old standbys of the title track and "The Kids Are Alright." Since this was a d?but album, I don't see the harm in recommending it as a possible first album for a fan, since this was the first Who album for many of the older fans, instead of like newer fans today being able to choose from any number of different compilations and albums, and if a band's debut album is a new fan's first, they'll be able to experience the band for the first time the way many of the older original fans did!




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